Tryptophan

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Scientific Name: Tryptophan
Brand Name: Aminosyn II 7 %, Sulfite-free, Aminosyn-PF 7%, Clinimix 2.75/5, Clinimix E 2.75/5, Clinisol 15, Freamine 6.9, Freamine III 10, Hepatamine 8, Nephramine, Olimel, Periolimel, Plenamine, Premasol, Primene, Procalamine 3, Prosol, Travasol 10, Trophamine 10 %, Tryptan
Company Owner: Not Available
Mechanism Of Action A number of important side reactions occur during the catabolism of tryptophan on the pathway to acetoacetate. The first enzyme of the catabolic pathway is an iron porphyrin oxygenase that opens the indole ring. The latter enzyme is highly inducible, its concentration rising almost 10-fold on a diet high in tryptophan. Kynurenine is the first key branch point intermediate in the pathway. Kynurenine undergoes deamniation in a standard transamination reaction yielding kynurenic acid. Kynurenic acid and metabolites have been shown to act as antiexcitotoxics and anticonvulsives. A second side branch reaction produces anthranilic acid plus alanine. Another equivalent of alanine is produced further along the main catabolic pathway, and it is the production of these alanine residues that allows tryptophan to be classified among the glucogenic and ketogenic amino acids. The second important branch point converts kynurenine into 2-amino-3-carboxymuconic semialdehyde, which has two fates. The main flow of carbon elements from this intermediate is to glutarate. An important side reaction in liver is a transamination and several rearrangements to produce limited amounts of nicotinic acid, which leads to production of a small amount of NAD
Description of the Drug: Tryptophan is an amino acid commonly found as a component of total parenteral nutrition.
Protein Data Bank:
Source: DrugBank Online – DrugBank.com. Retrieved 2023-01-23 from https://go.drugbank.com/drugs/DB00150